Anti-Alcohol Posters from the Soviet Union

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Anti-Alcohol Posters from the Soviet Union

Saturday October 06, 2018 Written by Garry

Soviet anti-drinking posters

The U.S. isn't the only country to have toyed with banning booze back in the day. Many places have given prohibition a go at one point or another, including Australia's own A.C.T. in 1911.

Even Russia, a country not known for its teetotaling, tried to wean itself of vodka back in 1914. The (highly unsuccessful) ban lasted until 1925. And while the country would never again attempt an outright ban, it would sporadically ask its citizens to have a good hard look at their booze-soaked selves.

The USSR ran several advertising campaigns between the '50s and '70s to warn its people of the evils of the bottle. The battle continued even under Gorbachev, who launched a campaign in 1985 to raise the price of alcohol and, so the theory went, restrict sales. (A move we’re assuming was later dropped by Boris Yeltsin.)

Of course, no PSA campaign is complete without a poster, and London design firm Fuel has compiled its favourite Soviet-era anti-alcohol posters into one neat book. Some of the posters make clear the association between alcohol and the breakdown of the self and family. Others are a little more obscure, with booze portrayed variously as a snake, or as a pig-shaped bottled threatening the proletariat.

Depressing stuff. Nice posters, though.

Soviet anti-drinking posters

Soviet anti-drinking posters

Soviet anti-drinking posters