The Bone-Chilling, Mesmerising Winterscapes of Iceland

The Bone-Chilling, Mesmerising Winterscapes of Iceland

Monday August 07, 2017 Written by Genevieve

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Christophe Jacrot was a filmmaker before he became a photographer, and it shows – his enigmatic series Snjór (Icelandic for ‘snow’) is a very cinematic experience. The series evolved out of Jacrot’s strange obsession: chasing “bad weather”.

Roving around the world to take pictures of the rains, winds, storms and natural disasters in places such as Hong Kong, Macao, Tokyo, Chicago, Lisbon and New York, Jacrot created some exciting work, but never quite felt like he was getting what he wanted. “I have spent the past three years despairing over the impossibility of being able to photograph a European winter,” the Parisian artist explains. Apparently, global warming had robbed him of the chance.

Everything changed when he finally made it to the most wintery place he could imagine. “In search of a snow-covered but peopled landscape, I ended up in Iceland, where, thanks to a "cold temperature anomaly" in the North Atlantic Ocean, the winter season in the past two years has actually resembled winter.”

Snjór is the result of the ultimate “bad weather” setting. Though bad might be a misleading term. Seems to us like the more accurate description might be ‘beguiling’, or ‘compelling’, or ‘completely and utterly haunting’. We’ll leave you to come to your own conclusions about the series’ best descriptor by checking out the full photo series here.

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