History Blog With Interesting Articles | Smith Journal

Care for a can of World War II-era ‘rationed ham chunks’? Us neither. But for this group of military food enthusiasts, there’s nothing like chowing down on a box of some decades-old food rations.

You won't find it listed on many atlases, but there's a tiny African nation inside the U.S. called the Yoruba Kingdom. No visas required.

Forget your smartphone app: the cartography-loving boffins at the New York Public Library have uploaded 20,000 hi-res historical maps of the world on to the internet.

For a brief few decades during the Cold War, these crazy-looking ships dominated the waterways of the USSR. Sea travel never looked more sci-fi.

Ever feel too distracted to do your work? So did 1920s inventor Hugo Gernsback – until he created this anti-distraction helmet.

Vale Shakespeare, 400 Years On

Saturday April 23, 2016

Ol' Billy-boy Shakespeare died on this day 400 years ago. To mark the occasion, here are some poetic facts about the bard. (He invented the word 'puking', for instance.)

Dictators, military coups, and stir-fried noodles. It turns out the world's favourite Thai dish has a surprisingly dark past – and mightn’t even be Thai at all.

And you thought The Revenant was tough-going. According to this doozy of an article, the true story that inspired it is – ahem – even grizzlier.

Today in Important Figures from History: meet Tommy Tucker, the orphaned, cross-dressing squirrel who captured America’s heart in the 1940s.

A physics professor from Adelaide says he’s just cracked a 70-year-old murder mystery. But the rest of the story is stranger than you might imagine.

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