Smith Journal · A quarterly, Australia-based publication that takes unexpected, interesting, funny and sometimes complicated stories and tells them the way you would to a bunch of friends at the pub.

You Did Not Sleep There

Saturday September 30, 2017

An Instagram account that's devoted to poking fun at the most illogical camping spots in the world. 

A Scandi webcomic artist has completely drawn us in with her language tree (and her mother tongue of Finnish is really out on a limb).

We unearthed one of the few DeLorean owners in Australia, and found out what it’s like doing your shopping in one of the rarest, quirkiest and most recognised sports cars of all time. 

Eerie symmetry. Futuristic dystopias. Strange characters full of veiled intentions. Photographs taken of 1940s New York by a 17-year-old Stanley Kubrick are a harbinger of his 50-year-strong career.  

How’s the Serenity?

Tuesday September 26, 2017

In what could be one of the most fun experiments in history, Sweden is inviting people to stay in these immersive cabins for 72 hours, to see whether stunning views, swimming and fishing is beneficial to their well-being. (As far as experiments go, it sure beats drug trials and sleep studies.) 

 

 

 

Abandoned Nuclear Missile Bases

Monday September 25, 2017

It’s not at the top of most people’s bucket lists, but this man realised his dream of photographing the world’s decommissioned nuclear missile bases. He located them with the help of Google Earth.  

Blonde on Blonde Heading Down Under

Sunday September 24, 2017

Grammy award-winning strings band Old Crow Medicine Show talk to Smith Journal about their upcoming Australian tour, where to eat the best fried catfish in Nashville, and Bob Dylan.  

The Tiny Worlds of Ali Alamedy

Saturday September 23, 2017

Meet the Iraqi refugee making exquisite miniature dioramas. 

Pint-Sized Pedestrians

Friday September 22, 2017

Filmmaker Jacob Krupnick thinks toddlers are "strange, mysterious little people". In this Q&A, he talks to Smith Journal about what drove him to capture their funny little meanderings in a series of two-minute films.

Read the chilling letters and see the Aboriginal souvenirs that tourists from around the world have returned to an outback store, believing the artefacts to be cursed.